Orange & Campari Marmalade

Dollop factor Rating: 5/5
Homemade: now stop it! of course it is.

 

ontoast

dollop on cream cheese

Under normal circumstances marmalade should take forever to make…softening skins overnight, juicing, deseeding, cutting, shredding, blah, blah, blah… it´s just taking the pith! (you´re welcome). In my mind, marmalade should just be made with massive dollops of love. (this is me winging it) I made this yesterday in under 2 hours and ate it on toast this morning, mostly due to the following 3 reasons:

  1. it smells so citrusy fresh
  2. it´s the colour of happiness
  3. when I was born I was last in the queue for willpower

orangemarmaladecartoon

The bitter/sour flavour of Campari offsets the sweetness of the orange marmalade and gives it a good tang. Perfect to slather on toast and butter or dollop on top of fresh crusty bread and cream cheese or try this….blend a large dollop of orange & Campari marmalade with a splash of rice vinegar, soy sauce, minced garlic and fresh ginger and use as a marinade for fresh tuna.

orange-shreds1

cut into shreds

This recipe will make 4-5 jars.
As usual this is a really easy recipe to follow.

YOU WILL NEED:

  • 1.5 kilos oranges
  • 2 lemons
  • 600 g sugar
  • 200 ml Campari
  • a large heavy bottomed saucepan

1. Wash the oranges in hot water

2. Cut the oranges and lemons in half, slice thinly and put into the pan

3. Add all the sugar to the pan

orangeshreds2

getting sticky!

4. Bring the mixture to the boil and then simmer for 1.5 – 2 hours. Stir frequently to prevent the mixture sticking to the bottom of the pan. When the mixture looks sticky and the colour has darkened slightly, do the jam test. (cold plate, dollop of jam, leave for 2 minutes, does it wrinkle when you put your finger through it?)

5. Before putting the marmalade into sterilised jars add 200 ml of Campari and stir.

 

Enjoy.

 

LITTLE KNOWN FACT: Until it was replaced by a synthetic (and probably cheaper) alternative, the cochineal beetle was responsible for the bright red colour of Campari. The cultivation of cochineal beetles in the 19th century was one of the most important industries in Tenerife. The Canary Islands still produces 40 tonnes per year…of beetles, not tourists.

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One thought on “Orange & Campari Marmalade

  1. Pingback: I’ve discovered the new Cronut…it´s the Spone! | knob & dollop

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